Kuber the Lord of Riches

Kuber the Lord of Riches

Kuber (also called Kubera or Kuvera), the lord of riches and treasures, is a demi-god in Hinduism. Kuber does not occupy a very conspicuous position in Hindu mythology except for his frequent mentions in the epic Ramayana as the God of gold and wealth.

The meaning of the name ‘Kuber’ in Sanskrit is ‘ill-shaped’ or ‘deformed’ although some say that his name is derived from ‘kumba,’ which means ‘to conceal.’ The former has bearings in the description of Kuber in later Puranic texts, where he is seen as fat and dwarf wearing a lot of jewelry and carrying a bag of gold coins, a club, and sometimes a pomegranate.

According to myths, Kuber was Lord Brahma’s 'mental' grandson, who deserted his father Vaisravana and went to his grandfather. Brahma, as a reward made him immortal, and appointed him to be the god of riches, with Lanka for his capital, and the car Pushpak for his vehicle. This car was of immense size, and moved at its owner's will at a marvelous speed; Ravana took it by force from Kuber, at whose death it was restored by Rama to its original possessor.

Kuber married Yakshi or Charvi; and two of his sons, through a curse of the sage Narada, became trees, in which condition they remained until Krishna, when an infant, uprooted them. As the story goes, Narada met with them in a forest, bathing with their wives, in a state of intoxication. The wives, ashamed of themselves, fell at Narada's feet and sought for pardon; but as their husbands, i.e., Kuber’s sons disregarded the presence of the sage, they suffered the full effects of his curse, and remained trees!

Hindu’s worship Kuber as the treasurer of wealth and bestower of riches, along with Goddess Lakshmi before Diwali on the Dhanteras day. This custom of worshiping Lakshmi and Kuber together is in prospect of doubling the benefits of such prayers.

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