Tibetan Buddhist Deity | Brass Statue | Handmade | Made in India | - DI138

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    • Size: 12.5 Inches Height X 8 Inches Width x 5 Inches Depth
    • SKU:DI138
    • Color: SOUTH FINISH
    • Weight: 4.7Kg
    • Material: Brass
    • About the color: This is a maintenance free finish, it never loss its shine and color you just have to wipe it with a dry cotton cloth. Usually, Brass changes their color with time, but with this color finishing stays lifetime.
    • Tara (Sanskrit: tara; , Dölma) or Arya Tara, also known as Jetsun Dölma in Tibetan Buddhism, is a female Bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism who appears as a female Buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism. She is known as the "mother of liberation", and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements. Tara is a tantric meditation deity whose practice is used by practitioners of the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner and secret teachings about compassion and emptiness.
    • Tara is an iconic Buddhist goddess of many colors. Although she is formally associated only with Buddhism in Tibet, Mongolia, and Nepal, she has become one of the most familiar figures of Buddhism around the world.
    • She is not exactly the Tibetan version of the Chinese Guanyin (Kwan-yin), as many assume. Guanyin is a manifestation in the female form of Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva. Avalokiteshvara is called Chenrezig in Tibet, and in Tibetan Buddhism Chenrezig usually is a "he" rather than a "she." He is the universal manifestation of compassion.
    • According to one story, when Chenrezig was about to enter Nirvana, he looked back and saw the suffering of the world, and he wept and vowed to remain in the world until all beings were enlightened. Tara is said to have been born from Chenrezig's tears. In a variation of this story, his tears formed a lake, and in that lake, a lotus grew, and when it opened Tara was revealed.
    • Tara's origins as an icon are unclear. Some scholars propose that Tara evolved from the Hindu goddess Durga. She appears to have been venerated in Indian Buddhism no earlier than the 5th century.
    • Her name in Tibetan is Sgrol-ma, or Dolma, which means "she who saves." It is said her compassion for all beings is stronger than a mother's love for her children. Her mantra is om tare tuttare ture svaha, which means, "Praise to Tara! Hail!"
    • There are actually 21 Taras, according to an Indian text called Homage to the Twenty-One Taras that reached Tibet in the 12th century. The Taras come in many colors, but the two most popular are White Tara and Green Tara. In a variation of the original legend, White Tara was born from the tears from Chenrezig's left eye, and Green Tara was born from the tears of his right eye.
    • In many ways, these two Taras complement each other. Green Tara often is depicted with a half-open lotus, representing night. White Tara holds a fully blooming lotus, representing the day. White Tara embodies grace and serenity and the love of a mother for her child; Green Tara embodies activity. Together, they represent boundless compassion that is active in the world both day and night.
    • Tibetans pray to White Tara for healing and longevity. White Tara initiations are popular in Tibetan Buddhism for their power to dissolve obstacles. The White Tara mantra in Sanskrit is:
    • Green Tara is associated with activity and abundance. Tibetans pray to her for wealth and when they are leaving on a journey. But the Green Tara mantra actually is a request to be freed from delusions and negative emotions.
    • As tantric deities, their role is not as objects of worship. Rather, through esoteric means, the tantric practitioner realizes himself as White or Green Tara and manifests their selfless compassion.
    • Dolma Karpo or White Tara is one of the twenty-one forms of Devi Tara, each of which is distinguished by a colour of complexion and a virtue. ‘Karpo’ is the Tibetan word for white, Dolma the Tibetan name for Tara. The murti that you see on this page is of the pristine Devi Tara, turned to by devotees in the quest of a long life and accompanying well-being.

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